LONDON - Tate Britain - Barbara Hepworth - Henry Moore



The gallery is situated on Millbank, on the site of the former Millbank Prison. Construction, undertaken by Higgs and Hill, commenced in 1893, and the gallery opened on 21 July 1897 as the National Gallery of British Art. However, from the start it was commonly known as the Tate Gallery, after its founder Sir Henry Tate, and in 1932 it officially adopted that name. Before 2000, the gallery housed and displayed both British and modern collections, but the launch of Tate Modern saw Tate's modern collections move there, while the old Millbank gallery became dedicated to the display of historical and contemporary British art. As a consequence, it was renamed Tate Britain in March 2000.









Tate Britain - The front part of the building was designed by Sidney R. J. Smith with a classical portico and domebehind, and the central sculpture gallery was designed by John Russell Pope. Tate Britain includes the Clore Gallery of 1987, designed by James Stirling, which houses work by J. M. W. Turner. The Clore Gallery has been regarded as an important example of Postmodern architecture, especially in the use of contextual irony: each section of the external facade quotes liberally from the building next to it in regard to materials and detailing.



Barbara Hepworth - Sculpture of a Modern World - 
Book now to see Barbara Hepworth, one of the leading sculptors of the 20th century. This retrospective of one of Britain’s greatest artists features many of her most significant and beautiful sculptures in wood, stone and bronze alongside rarely seen works.
This exhibition traces Hepworth’s growing international success offering fresh ways of thinking about her art. Uniquely, this retrospective also plays with the different spaces in which Hepworth presented her work – the show includes an impressive reconstruction of a modernist structure to showcase Hepworth’s ‘ideal’ environment. Among the highlights are four large sculptures in sumptuous African hardwood – the high point in her post war carving career – reunited in one room.








 Henry Moore - 



Permanent Collections - 
Francis Bacon - Triptych August 1972 -

Andrew Lord - Biting - 
Henry Moore - animal head  -
Francis Bacon - Three studies for Figures at the base of a Crucifixion -

V&A - 



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