SAN DIEGO - Balboa park - Old town San Diego

Le parc Balboa est nommé en l'honneur de l'explorateur espagnol Vasco Núñez de Balboa. Il a été le lieu de la Panama-California Exposition de 1915 et de la California Pacific International Exposition de 1935, lesquelles ont chacune établi des sites d'intérêt architectural dans le parc. Le site a été préservé dès 1835, et est donc un des plus anciens sites aux États-Unis dédiés à des fins récréatives.
Balboa Park, et ses bâtiments historiques, ont été déclarées National Historic Landmark en 1977 et placés sous l'autorité du Registre national des sites historiques. Le parc Balboa est géré et entretenu par l'intendance des parcs et loisirs de la ville de San Diego.

Casa del Prado - The Casa del Prado’s larger, exterior courtyard, Patio B, is surrounded by a one-storey Spanish-style arcade, physically connecting the Casa with the Casa del Prado Theatre to the north. Both venues serve as home to a number of youth arts organizations, bringing together office, rehearsal and performance spaces as well as a venue for Botanical Garden Foundation shows and special exhibitions. 


Botanical building - The view of the Botanical Building with the Lily Pond in the foreground is one of the most photographed scenes in Balboa Park and a "must-see" destination in San Diego. Built for the 1915-16 Exposition, along with the adjacent Lily Pond, the historic building is one of the largest lath structures in the world. The Botanical Building plantings include more than 2,100 permanent plants, featuring fascinating collections of cycads, ferns, orchids, other tropical plants, and palms. The Botanical Building also presents some of the Park's vibrant seasonal flower displays.
Le parc Balboa est un parc public de 4,9 km2 situé à San Diego. Le parc est nommé en l'honneur de l'explorateur espagnol Vasco Núñez de Balboa. Il a été le lieu de la Panama-California Exposition de 1915 et de la California Pacific International Exposition de 1935, lesquelles ont chacune établi des sites d'intérêt architectural dans le parc. Le site a été préservé dès 1835, et est donc un des plus anciens sites aux États-Unis dédiés à des fins récréatives. Outre des espaces ouverts de la végétation naturelle, il contient une variété d'attractions culturelles, y compris de nombreux musées, théâtres, magasins et restaurants, ainsi que le zoo de San Diego.
Casa del prado - The courtyard provides a large open area with scenic views of the twin domes of the adjacent theatre, the Botanical Building gardens to the west and the historic Morton Bay Fig tree in front of the Natural History Museum to the east. Plantings of various types of palms set off each of the corners of the plaza area.
Museum of photographic art - One of the few institutions in the country devoted to photography, film and video, the Museum of Photographic Arts exhibits work from its collection of more than 7,000 images as well as from new artists, representing the entire history of photography, its aesthetic movements, and technological advancements. Illustrating the complex and varied history of the medium, the museum's collection is particularly strong in modern and contemporary work, specifically social documentary photography and photojournalism. The museum is also home to a state-of-the-art movie theater.
Natural history museum - Features fascinating exhibitions and a new giant-screen Dolby digital 3D theater showing films with a focus on the natural world. The museum’s award-winning exhibit design team creates exhibitions on the unique and biodiverse southern California region. In addition, the museum hosts several traveling exhibitions each year which teach visitors about our natural world as it is today and as it was in the past.
Museum of art - As the region's oldest and largest art museum, the San Diego Museum of Art's renowned holdings include a fine selection of European old masters, 19th and 20th century American art, an encyclopedic Asian collection, and growing collections of contemporary and Latin American art. In addition, the museum presents major art exhibitions from around the world, as well as an extensive schedule of supporting cultural and educational programs.
Garden of the museum of art -
Museum of man - Located beneath the ornate 200-foot California Tower, the San Diego Museum of Man is the city’s only museum devoted to anthropology. With its Spanish colonial and mission style architecture, the landmark building was originally constructed for the 1915–16 Panama-California Exposition. Today, a key focus of the museum is to create and display dynamic and educational anthropological exhibits about people and places throughout the Americas and around the world.
Alcazar Garden - Alcazar Garden, named because its design is patterned after the gardens of Alcazar Castle in Seville, Spain, lies adjacent to the Art Institute and Mingei Museum. It is known for its ornate fountains, exquisite turquoise blue, yellow, and green Moorish tiles and shady pergola. This formal garden, bordered by boxwood hedges, is planted with 7,000 annuals for a vibrant display of color throughout the year. The garden has been reconstructed to replicate the 1935 design by San Diego architect Richard Requa.
Spanish village art center - Daily art demonstrations featuring contemporary fine arts and crafts directly from San Diego County's largest community of artists. Thirty-seven working artist studios/galleries host over two hundred independently juried local painters, sculptors, metalsmiths, jewelry designers, clay artists, gourd artists, photographers, printmakers, fiber artists, basket weavers, mixed-media artists, glass artists, and more. Enjoy the colorful flagstone patio filled with seasonal blooms, and unique shops housed under the historic Spanish-tile roofed buildings.
 Old town - Old town San Diego est en réalité un village pour touristes, une sorte de Disney à la sauce  mexicaine, très cliché et non conservé dans le style d'origine.
Old Town San Diego is considered the "birthplace" of California. San Diego is the site of the first permanent Spanish settlement in California. It was here in 1769, that Father Junipero Serra came to establish the very first mission in a chain of 21 missions that were to be the cornerstone of California’s colonization. Father Serra’s mission and Presidio were built on a hillside overlooking what is currently known as Old Town San Diego. At the base of the hill in 1820’s, a small Mexican community of adobe buildings was formed and by 1835 had attained the status of El Pueblo de San Diego. Historic buildings include La Casa de Estudillo, La Casa de Bandini, La Casa de Altamirno Pedrorena and the Mason Street School, San Diego’s first one room schoolhouse.
 (c) Chavanitas